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sanctions, more sanctions. we will get congress to pass a law that will make it illegal for us to have any carrots. that means that diplomacy will not work. it is dangerous across the board. the reason why it is more dangerous to say a red line will be crossed so early is, number one, it brings it much closer, ratcheting up the political pressure. it does not change anything on the ground. but once a candidate boxes himself in, and we're talking man here, so i will not say himself/herself, one candid it boxes himself in and say i will set as a red line iran obtain nuclear capability. if gov. ronnie's good friend, benjamin netanyahu, says that he believes that iran has obtained nuclear capability, candidate romney would say one thing and president romney would feel differently on making good on that. >> you mentioned the state of israel, the nation of israel. let's talk about that for just a second. mr. netanyahu has been unsuccessful over the past few weeks, no matter how much he has tried, even inside of israel, making the case that he has tried to make about the red line and backing the
question, one of the rules of law i think has got to be a first priority for us all, and then within that as we seek for women's rights, they're human rights, we have got to stop exaggerating, as the u.n. system has done for so much, abortion as the leading thing that is being fought for for women. we need -- if we want to help their reproductive health, we need to be not only calling for marriage at a later age but making sure that their sexual end engagement happens in a place that is security and -- >> that's such a red herring. these people can't afford -- you know, look, this -- you mentioned the economic imperative. it's there. but it's worse than that because it's now become cultural as well, so that even if you are well off, you are supposed to choose the bride for -- or to choose the groom for -- because that assures that for the rest of her life she will be taken care of. i think this is very, very difficult, but i am sure who the messengers must be. >> behind the headlines, wage theft. it's a little known problem affecting vulnerable women across the country which is costi
interestingly, castro says we have a secret law that prohibits us from transferring tactical nuclear weapons to your country. there is no such law, but he tells castro that we have this lot. castro suggests the law should be repealed. can you repeal this law? basically he begged the premier to leave these -- what he thought i was -- what he thought of as the last defense against the united states -- in cuba. but the premier says no, we cannot. all nuclear weapons are leaving cuba. that conversation and his mission is accomplished. what it shows in my view is that two but was -- cuba was a pawn in the game, but now we see that you could have made the crisis much more dangerous. >> the tactical nuclear weapons have been used -- if the tactical nuclear weapons had been used, 100,000 american soldiers would have been killed. >> in 1962 both nikita christoph and john kennedy acknowledged out close they had gone to nuclear war. christoph -- khrushchev agreed to work towards nuclear stability through kennedy's second term. it was never to be. >> one of the publications in the syrian conflict over t
't prosper without rule of law. because that is exactly our main focus, in the sense that we are not prosecuting drugs by drugs themselves. we are looking for rule of law in mexico. we want a country in which the law prevails. otherwise it will be impossible to prosper or to have a fair society. >> rose: we continue talking about google ventures with kevin rose and bill maris. >> we're investing in teams and people more than products at the early stages. so you're looking for larry and certificate guy as they were starting out they are what made google different from lycos and the other search engines. >> rose: we con chrood with the photography of brigitte lacombe. >> she asked would we be interested in doing something similar for london olympic on women in sport. and of course, i mean, it was just like a great opportunity because i mean for me and also for my sister to discover the new world, i know nothing about sports. and it was very intriguing. >> rose: yes. >> and so of course we said yes. >> rose: felipe calderon, bill regard maris, kevin rose and brigitte lacombe whe
in an unprecedented intrusion. the supreme court has rejected a challenge to a 2008 law granting immunity to telecom companies that aided the bush administration's warrantless domestic spy program. groups including the electronic frontier foundation and the american civil liberties union had brought the case, consolidating 33 different lawsuits against the company's after a lower court ruled that the firms are protected by congressionally mandated retroactive immunity. in appeals court upheld the case's dismissal last year. on tuesday, the supreme court declined to hear it without comment. the ruling could mark the end of legal attempts to hold the telecom firms accountable for the spying. in a statement, the electronic frontier foundation said -- the justice department as filed a lawsuit accusing the banking giant wells fargo of making reckless mortgage loans that ultimately cost the federal government hundreds of millions of dollars in insurance claims. wells fargo is alleged to abuse the federal housing ministration program by recklessly handing out loans and forcing the government to foot the bi
federal law by endorsing political candidates from the pulpit. those who do so risk losing their churches' tax-exempt status. according to a recent survey by the christian polling organization lifeway, 87% of pastors believe pastors should refrain from making political endorsements. the survey included both evangelical and mainline clergy. >>> the supreme court opened its new term on monday and a majority of the justices -- six of the nine -- attended the annual red mass, held the sunday before at st. matthew's cathedral in washington. at the annual event, catholic leaders encourage the justices to draw wisdom from their faith as they make their decisions. the court is set to tackle controversial issues once again this term, including a case involving affirmative action at the university of texas. many religious groups are anxious to see if the court will also agree to hear arguments on same-sex marriage. >>> a leading opponent of same-sex marriage, catholic bishop salvatore cordileone, has been elevated to archbishop of san francisco. cordileone was formally installed in a ceremony on th
the presidential campaign. it is reasonable to think these are settled policy and settled law. come to find out they're not settled law and could quickly not be settled law. you wonder what happened that we're suddenly refighting all the battles? >> what happened is racism, i mean, suddenly, we have a proud black family in the white house and suddenly, i mean, this year, for the first yearr i believe, babies born were more babies of color than white babies. you know, there is -- there is fear. and it just doesn't feel right to folks. so the answer is blowing in the wind. you know, it depends what we but it is a profound change to think of this country -- you know, this may be a little far out what i'm about to say, but i think that as people bear the mark of their childhood and that is what is familiar. until they dig it out, look at the wound, i mean, this country was born in a profoundly violent way. you know, the biggest almost genocide in history. you know, 90% of the people who llved here, the 500 tribes and nations, whatever who lived here, were killed by invasion and disease and so on. a
new. >> here's what conservatives tell me. they embrace law and order conceptually and they say we're talking about enforcing the law and if the law isn't enforced a society cannot hold itself cohesively together. the second thing they say is we can't have a cohesive, coherent country without a common language. if you have two peoples living side by side speaking separate languages, you're not going to have a country. >> we heard the arguments. as far as the language is concerned, everyone knows english is the official language in the country. why is it necessary to make it official by law? i think there's more draw backs to that because, for example, in california when they tried to make english the official language it was virtually impossible. it didn't work. it was approved, but it didn't work. why? because you have so many different languages that are spoken there. besides spanish you have several asian languages. what would happen is in the schools, the schools would be forced to send all materials to parents in english when you have elderly who do not speak the language and
to the pills that bring a pregnancy to an end. it's a radical and controversial step. the law on abortion is very different in northern ireland. it's only allowed in highly restricted circumstances. so only a small number of medical abortions using tablets will be provided here. many other women will still have to travel if they want a termination. because they won't meet the legal requirements in northern ireland. >> i think there will still be a lot of women that have to come to the u.k. because they don't need the legal cry tia of currently in northern ireland. so we'll be treating very small numbers of women. but actually we still want to offer those women choice and access to really good health care and advice. >> abortion provokes a particularly heated debate in northern ireland. it's so heavily restricted that many believe it's entirely illegal. official figures show between 30 and 40 a year are carried out by the m.h.s. the government is facing pressure to publish up to date guidelines. pro life campaigners say this clinic is a blatant challenge to the values of northern ireland.
will be jailed for another two years. a federal appeals court has reinstated a montana law limiting donations to political campaigns. it was among several that have been struck down in montana the decision citing the supreme court's landmark citizens united ruling that allowed unlimited corporate spending on elections. this week, the ninth u.s. circuit court of appeals reversed an earlier challenge saying the judge who struck it down needs to provide his full reasoning for allowing unlimited money in political campaigns. today marks 10 years since the senate voted to authorize use of military force against iraq, paving the way for the u.s. invasion that would come less than six months later. among those to vote in favor were future democratic presidential candidates john kerry, hillary clinton, john edwards, and joe biden, who squares off against another lawmaker who also voted yes, congressmember paul ryan, in today's rise presidential debate. and those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!,", the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are in our 100-city tou
them but within a certain rule of law, that countries that do that -- and countries that keep their international agreements, i.e., the treaty with israel, countries that do that do well in the modern world. and we should basically be saying "you live up to those principles and we will be happy to partner with you on your schools, on programs to promote literacy, on programs to empower women, on programs to build a stronger electoral politics." but i think we need to make very clear that have's there's a really important principle for me, charlie. the middle east only puts a smile on your face when it starts with them. that is, if we're cramming things down their throat that they don't really want it's not going to happen. and one of the things that i really believe is that the initiative's got to come from them. one thing we must not do, though and it's something we've done for, i think, 40 years, is kind of view it like we need them more than they need us. oh, no, if we actually make these demands on them for this kind of politics, this kind of treatment of women, this kind
next month. >> the island are inherent japanese territory. international law and history confirmed this. japan controls the islands, while china and taiwan claim them. saito hopes japan can solve the dispute in a rational and peaceful way. he said it helped him to understand the historical context. he said he supports a peaceful settlement of the issue. saito told reporters japan has no plan to raise the issue at meetings. japan and china are also expected to take part in the summit and cambodia. >>> japan and taiwan are discussion whether or not to resume talks about fishing rights around the islands. japanese officials say they will kid china's views before returning to the negotiating table. the talks have been stalled more than three years. senior officials last month discussed the timing for reopening the talks. taiwan's leaders want to start as soon as possible the they want access to the areas, tuna fishing groun ining ground. they think the discussions will improve ties and keep china in check. relations between china and taiwan have deteriorated since they nationalized the isla
in term of history and international law. and repeated his country's position that the islands are china's territory. in conclusion, the two sides agree to make arrangements to hold a meeting of vice ministers following the one held last month now. this territorial dispute bubbled below the surface for decades. and there have been flare-ups issued before. but experts say this recent one drove japan/china relations to the lowest levels, and normalized diplomatic ties 40 years ago. look act how we got to this point in today's choina report. the story from our studio in beijing. >> reporter: the demonstrations have mostly died down. but chinese,0 vessels remain active near the waters near the islands. several chinese ships brief leave entered japan any territorial waters. various exchange programs are being canceled. national day celebrated on october 1. a large number of chinese traveled overseas during the holiday. but, many tours to japan were canceled. our beijing correspondent reports on the circumstances that created china's fierce response. >> a key event took place before the start
ministry suggesting that the chinese telecommunications companies operate within the law, but they have gained their success through their own commercial competitiveness and that they should not be singled out by u.s. congressional committees for criticism in this way. so it appears the chinese government is already lining up in defense. this is a damning report from an official body singling out two companies by name and suggesting that they simply have not done enough over the course of this investigation to demonstrate that they are free from influence from beijing. >> my understanding is the foreign ministry has done slightly more than just condemn this. have they not said this is the result of some kind of prejudice in america of chinese companies? >> in a sense, that is in the context in which there is a kind of growing focus on the issues of their trade and open access. i think we are beginning to get the sense that china feels, particularly in the run-up to the u.s. presidential election, that it is being unfairly targeted. i think the foreign ministry statement times with some
countries to reunite almost all european continents. freedom, democracy. rule of law and respect for human rights are the ones that people all over the world aspire to. >> but the e.u. has won the peace prize in the midst of an acute financial crisis which has led to violent demonstrations in greece and spain. in europe, all divisions are reopening. perhaps that's why the european -- the nobel committee wants to boost it, prevent it from fragmenting. >> well, it's turned up a lot of discussion. we'll be going to the self-appointed capital of the e.u., brussels in a moment. first of all, we're going to catch you up on other stories making headlines around the world. idea's winner of the nobel prize for literature says he hoping the compatriot who won two years ago would soon be freed as he was jailed in 2009 and serving an 11-year sentence for inciting subversion of to the power. >> and the president's mohammed to remove the country's top prosecutor. as a farce, the president's move follows an angry public response to the acquittal of a group of supporters of the outgoing regime. reducing t
is really violations of international law in the occupied territories presented its findings to a u.n. panel on monday after a weekend of testimony in new york. the russell tribunal on palestine was created in 2009 to bring attention to the responsibility other states bear for israel's violations of international all. presenting a summary, two of the jurists said israeli violations were impossible without u.s. government backing. >> the tribunal finds that israel's ongoing colonial settlement expansion, its racial separatism policies, as well as its violent militarism would not be possible without the united states economic military and diplomatic support. >> the russell tribunal session here in new york will give us the opportunity to further persuade people who believe in justice and equality and peace in this country that they should join the campaign for solidarity with palestinian people and palestinian freedom. the ousted president mohamed nasheed after he ignored a summons to appear in court. he is facing charges of illegally ordering the arrest of a judge appointed by gayoom, who rul
.d. suppression laws, barriers to understanding the deadlines and when you need to vote -- register to vote, to go out and vote. there is language barriers autos well. going out to vote most of these women and men that latinos, hard working, working not just 9:00 to 5:00 they're working the dawn, early hours then until very late. that's another barrier that you can do why latino community is not coming out. but i'm optimistic i think the number will be 12 million for this year. >> that would be good. 50% of eligible. >> it's always a challenge with a younger population, younger people are challenged to vote and so i think that that then becomes exacerbated when you look at the latino vote. i'm very optimistic. in my state of maryland we have something as driver, maryland dream act that will be on our ballot that is great in seven i have to vote. also in addition to removing those barriers, expanding opportunities to vote whether it's early voting or late polling hours those are really important to get people out who are in fact hard working and doing lots of other things in their lives. >> as you
% of coastal and marine areas by 2020. but many governments have yet to pass laws enforcing the protocol. some developing countries say they can't afford to implement the policies. the participants in india are expected to discuss how to secure funding to meet the targets agreed in nagoya. >>> australian prime minister julia gillard urged japan to sign a free trade agreement with her country as soon as possible. she said no other fta would be more natural or logical. gillard spoke at a reception in sydney to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the japan/aust rai australia business conference. >> japan is a critically important economic partner for australia and will remain so in the future. but in a dynamic and changing region, it's time to take the next step. it's time to seal the deal on the free trade agreement. >> gillard also referred to regional security issues. she said australia and japan must work together to balance rising asian powers such as china and india. she said she wants to use the g-20 summit and the asia pacific economic cooperation forum to work with japan an security jap as
] respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy, justice, the rule of law, and respect for human rights. >> that was the european commission president, tariq ali. >> amy, barroso was a leader of portugal during the iraq war and decided to back against the wishes of the majority of the portuguese people. for him to talk about defending human rights when he participated in a war that led to over the debt -- led to the death of over zero million people is outrageous. not only outside the european union, but inside, barroso and the other members of the eu have suspended habeas corpus, which have limited civil rights and human rights, which have participated in renditions and handing over european citizens to be tortured and other parts of the world or to be sent to guantanamo. so all of this brings very hollow. as for the absurd remark that the european union has united europe after the war? that is total nonsense. it did not exist after the war. were actually helped western europe, not eastern europe, which helped western europe after the second world war and had nothing to do with europe.
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)